Harvard Book Club --Thursday March 28

The next Harvard Club of Cincinnati Book Club meeting is set for Thursday, April 25, 2019 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bronte Cafe in the Joseph Beth Bookstore.

The selected book for our Thursday, April 25th meeting is "Work of Art," by Sinclair Lewis.

Book Description:

In "Work of Art," three generations of the Weagle family grow up in and work for boarding houses, inns and hotels.  The focus is on two brothers, Myron and Ora, of the second generation.  Poetic, ethereal Ora could not wait to escape hotel drudgery, though never too proud to ask plodding Myron for money.  Sinclair Lewis, as always, tells a great yarn, this time about the ups and downs in a rising America's unending pursuit of craftsmanship and material success.

Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1930 "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters," his works are known for their insightful and critical views of American capitalism and materialism between the wars.  He is also respected for his strong characterizations of modern working women.  H.L. Mencken wrote of him, "[If] there was ever a novelist among us with an authentic call to the trade...it is this red-haired tornado from the Minnesota wilds."

About the Author:

Sinclair Lewis was born in 1885 in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, and graduated from Yale University in 1908.  His college career was interrupted by various part-time occupations, including a period working at the Helicon Home Colony, Upton Sinclair's socialist experiment in New Jersey.  He worked for some years as a free lance editor and journalist, during which time he published several minor novels.  But with the publication of Main Street (1920), which sold half a million copies, he achieved wide recognition.  This was followed by the two novels considered by many to be his finest, Babbitt (1922) and Arrowsmith (1925), which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1926, but declined by Lewis.  In 1930, following Elmer Gantry

(1927) and Dodsworth (1929), Sinclair Lewis became the first American author to be awarded the Nobel Prize for distinction in world literature.  This was the apogee of his literary career, and in the period from Ann Vickers (1933) to the posthumously published World So Wide (1951) Lewis wrote ten novels that reveal the progressive decline of his creative powers.  From Main Street to Stockholm, a collection of his letters, was published in 1952, and The Man from Main Street, a collection of essays, in 1953.  During his last years Sinclair Lewis wandered extensively in Europe, and after his death in Rome in 1951 his ashes were returned to his birthplace.

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Other Books Recently Suggested:

"Lost Illusions," by Honore Balzac

"Short Stories by Jesus:  The Enigmatic Parables of a Controversial Rabbi," by Amy-Jill Levine

"Reconstruction:  Opposing Viewpoints," by Brenda Stalcup

"Denmark Vesey's Garden:  Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy," by Ethan J. Kytle and Blain Roberts

"Just Mercy:  A Story of Justice and Redemption," by Bryan Stevenson

"One Hundred Years of Solitude," by Gabriel Garcia Marques

"100 Things to See in the Night Sky:  From Planets to Satellites to Meteors and Constellations, Your Guide to Stargazing," by Dean Regas

"Social Science Methods for Psychodynamic Inquiry," by William R. Meyers

"Personal History," by Katharine Graham

"Plrknib," by Alex Bernstein

"The Red Tent," by Anita Diamant

"Commander in Chief:  FDR's Battle with Churchill, 1943," by Nigel Hamilton

"The Mantle of Command," by Nigel Hamilton

May will be a non-fiction month.  If you have suggestions or other concerns, please contact Book Club Chair Steve Strauss, sdstrauss@earthlink.net or 321 0967.

 

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When:

Thursday, 04/25/19 at 7:30pm - 9:00pm | iCal

Where:

Bronte Cafe: Joseph Beth Booksellers
2692 Madison Rd.
Cincinnati, OH 45208

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